Portrait no.22

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22 of 26 Professor Dame Pamela Shaw is a big hitter in the world of MND. She was made a dame in 2014 for her internationally recognised contribution to neurosciences, and particularly through the pioneering work she leads at SITran – The Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience. “The first gene that was found to cause familial MND was back in 1993 and it’s called SOD1 – Not a bad name for a disease that causes MND! That gene code is for a protein whose normal function is to scavenge the free radicals that we produce as our cells are generating energy. There are now about thirty genes we’ve found that can cause MND. A tiny change in one building block of the SOD1 gene causes familial MND. At SITran we’ve shown that if you knock out that SOD1 gene with gene therapy you can just about cure mice of MND and the mice remain fine because there are other proteins that can do the same job. We are doing a human trial. There are various ways of doing gene therapy. One, which is the method we used in the mice, is to use a viral carrier (or vector) where the virus is harmless but we put inside the viral carrier a molecule and when it gets into the nervous system it knocks down the level of SOD1. In Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), which is a childhood form of MND, that viral vector has been used to knock out SOD1 in children with SMA in a US trial. Children with SMA usually die of their MND within 2 years of being born. One dose of that viral vector and those kids are now normal toddlers so it’s fantastic! It will come for adult MND as well shortly I hope. In the meantime there’s a way of injecting a substance known as ASO. A lumbar puncture injection of this and that knocks down the SOD1 gene. It’s an international study and SiTran is the UK site. We’ve been doing it for about 18 months. The first two patients that we put into the trial have been sending videos of themselves walking up the garden steps that they hadn’t been able to do for three years. I’ve done probably twenty-four new treatment trials in MND and I have never ever heard people say they have improved before in a trial.” To help donate here https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd

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To support the work of the MND Association, donate here – www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd

or text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070 

Thank you 🙂

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Portrait no.21

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21 of 26 Jay Parker had been in his job as social media officer for the MND Association for five months when we interviewed him at their HQ, David Niven House in 2015. “MND ranks quite highly on the cruelty scale. It seems like torture to me. I couldn’t imagine having it. It has scared me and it makes me want to do things sooner in life rather than later just in case there’s something awful lurking round the corner. Since starting here I’ve seen lots of documentaries and things like that about people who have lived a normal life, quite happy then suddenly were just struck down with MND and it destroyed their lives. So yeah, it’s high up there for a terrible disease. In my job in social media we can measure success in numbers. Since the Ice Bucket Challenge the likes on Facebook and followers on Twitter have more than doubled. My goal would be to keep raising that awareness. Making sure people know what MND is. In fact I’m even doing that in my own family. I’ve only been here five months but I’ve fed back everything I’m learning in this job straight to my family – My sister and mum and dad. They’d not heard of MND either but now they feel exactly the same way as me. They all think it’s absolutely horrible.” To help the MND Association donate using this URL https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd

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To support the work of the MND Association, donate here – www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd

or text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070 

Thank you 🙂

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20 of 26 Belinda Cupid left a job working in cancer research as a biochemist to join the MND Association. When we interviewed her in 2015 she’d been at the Association for fifteen years and was their Head of Research. She now works at the Cystic Fibrosis Trust. “Although I had not done any research about MND before, after I got the job and started mentioning motor neurone disease to friends all these people seemed to appear who had connections to the disease. It was really staggering! I had a job working in a lab but wanted to work more with people as well as use my research knowledge. A vacancy here came up that I got and I really haven’t looked back! I meet people with MND when I go out and give talks explaining what’s going on in research. When you find out that someone with MND loses their independence and loses their voice and everything else that goes with this disease, that catches people’s attention and they want to help. That’s why there’s such a huge commitment by the staff at the MND Association. They’re always willing to do anything they can. It’s probably one of the reasons why I stayed here so long!” . To help support the work of the motor neurone disease, you can donate here: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd #MND #ALS #running #marathon #Tallinn

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or text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070 

Thank you 🙂

Portrait no.19

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19 of 26 Professor Siddharthan Chandran is the MacDonald Professor and Head of Neurology at the University of Edinburgh and director at the Euan MacDonald Centre for Motor Neurone Disease Research. His research combines specialist clinics with laboratory research on human stem cells. “I always advise newly diagnosed people to look at the MND Association website as that’s a very good website. I encourage them to sign up for research studies and I talk to them about research. I do that for various reasons, not least that we need it, but what I’ve learnt from people with the disease and their families is the value of research to the person and their family. Riluzole is the only globally licensed medicine and it is marginally beneficial – giving an extra one, two or three months to a persons lifespan. What everybody wants is something that will profoundly slow MND down. Even by six months or twelve months. Delay time for breathing support, for feeding support. It would be spectacular if we could buy a year! I’m professionally an optimist. I’ve seen great change in my career time in other diseases – MS has undergone a revolution in treatment since I was at medical school. I think MND is ripe for change and it would be terrific to contribute to that. I’m also hopeful because all the people I meet with the disease and all the families are up for promoting and enabling research. They want it. They need it. The least we can do is try and meet their expectations. My ambition, and the reason for coming up to Edinburgh (it wasn’t for the weather) is because Edinburgh has made a claim and has prioritised and continues to make strategic investments in this emerging area of medicine called regenerative medicine. There will come a day when neurologists will not only slow MND down and stop it, but in some instances begin to devise ways that you can restore and give back, to an extent, that which has been lost. I’m a great believer in that. I think it will happen.” . To help the work of the Motor Neurone Disease Association donate via our Just Giving page: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd

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To support the work of the MND Association, donate here – www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd

or text ‘mmnd99 £5.00‘ (or whatever you can afford) to 70070 

Thank you 🙂

Portrait no.11

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11 of 26. Karen Morrison, professor of neurology at University Hospital Southampton. When interviewed in 2016, Professor Karen Morrison was Bloomer Professor of Neurology, University of Birmingham and Honorary Consultant Neurologist at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham. She’s now Associate Dean, Education and Student Experience, Professor of Neurology and Director of Education, Honorary Consultant Neurologist at University Hospital Southampton. She was the specialist who confirmed Miles’s diagnosis of primary lateral sclerosis variant MND in 2013. “I have seen hundreds if not thousands of people with MND and every one of them is an individual. As I’ve got older and wiser I realise that just the interaction with the individual patients is what counts as being a good doctor for them. Yes, we have been working towards finding effective treatments but actually at the end of the day patients want you to be a good doctor above all, and certainly that’s what I feel I have in my control at the moment. We don’t have a treatment that stops the neurodegeneration. If only we had a treatment that slowed it down so that even if it progressed, if it progressed over thirty or forty years on average, that would be a real step forwards. So we don’t have that, but our knowledge about what causes the disease has increased so much over the last twenty years. I do think that treatments that really will make a difference will be here within the next ten years. From my experience, people with MND can live with such spirit. I’m a big advocate of never giving up hope and actually there’s much more to a fulfilled life than being able to wiggle your big toe! I am constantly amazed by the resilience of the human spirit in the face of this disease. I think it's really important that everyone, doctors included, travels with hope because I think travelling hopefully is a so much better way to travel than to travel with none.” ___________________________________________ Help find an effective treatment for MND by donating here: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd #MND #ALS #running #marathon #Tallinn #motorneuronedisease

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Portrait no.10

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10 of 26 portraits for @26miles4mnd Sally Light, CEO of the motor neurone disease association. We photographed Sally Light in October 2016. She is the Chief Executive of the Motor Neurone Disease Association – the only national charity in England, Wales and Northern Ireland helping people affected by MND and the charity your donations to 26miles4mnd are supporting. “I didn’t have a connection to motor neurone disease when I started here but now I strongly feel I do have a personal connection because I’ve lost so many people that I’d come to care for. Most recently in the last twelve months we lost two trustees from the board which was very, very hard. But I’m optimistic. Last Thursday for instance, I went up to Nottingham and I presented a long service award to a volunteer who’d been with us for thirty years. So those things give you such a feeling of optimism about the ability that the community has to all get behind the cause and really make a difference. I think one of the really important parts of the Association is the massive contribution that’s made by volunteers. We have these eighty-eight branches and groups right across England, Wales and Northern Ireland and they provide fantastic local support to people. They really are the heart of the Association and we couldn’t do a proportion of what we do without them.” ___________________________________________ To help support the work of the motor neurone disease, you can donate here: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd #MND #ALS #running #marathon #Tallinn #motorneuronedisease

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Portrait no.9

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9 of 26 Hilary Rowberry Hilary Rowberry was living with a slowly developing ALS variant of MND and working as a branch MND Association volunteer when we interviewed her in October 2015. She sadly died after a stroke on June 9th 2017. She told us she had not heard of motor neurone disease before she was diagnosed and felt that she should have done because she worked as a nurse for forty years. She was amazed at how varied the symptoms of MND can be. “I just say that the brains not connected with the muscles and the muscles have become weak in my legs – in my case in my legs – but that’s me. There was another lady near here who’s one arm went completely and there are people who look perfectly well up and about but they have no voice. I find this quite staggering – the different ways it affects people. I’ve been to a couple of the big MND Association meetings and you meet all sorts of different people with MND. Some are quite obvious as they’re in neurological wheelchairs and others are walking around looking like normal and then you notice they have a device that helps them communicate with you because MND has taken away their voice.” https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/26miles4mnd #MND #ALS #running #marathon #Tallinn #motorneuronedisease

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